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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)
a better school. it also led in part to the landmark civil rights place -- decision, brown vs. board of education. my grandmother and her sisters realized early on that education was important for their survival. their unshakeable persistence and unflinching sacrifice led them to better lives. not only did they had -- have to do with racism but the belief that a woman's place was in the home and in this case on the farm doing the chores like cooking, cleaning, milking the cow and cutting wood. this is the 1930's. you have to cut wood for everything. as i mentioned earlier prince edward county was not interested in educating colored children but my grandmother and her sisters were persistent and found a school in the neighboring county of appomattox which was down the street from the courthouse where general robert e. lee surrendered to general ulysses s. grant that ended the civil war. once they found that school that had the next calabash task of convincing their father they should go to school. and the way they convinced him was by saying we will take care of the chores on the farm
motivated your interest in politics? >> i guess i have always been passionate about civil rights and equality for everyone, and i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality and other issues, but i guess i have always been someone that is vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, and having to listen to many perspectives before making key decisions. as an activist in chinatown, i have always felt that working families and people who work in our neighborhoods need to have much more support. it is always about giving more voice to immigrants or the underserved and workers in the city. that is what drives my passion as a supervisor. >> tell me about the process of running for supervisor. what did you learn from the campaign process? was anything surprising? supervisor mar: i had to move from being a regular person that barely gets his kid to school on time and makes her a healthy lunch to having to go to a photo opportunities. i was on the school board for eight years, i had some training. and i was in the democratic party cen
mail it anywhere in the world. >> hot topic for voters next month. one of the oldest civil rights group was they are saying about same-sex marriage. you made up your mind not to go to work. do you have an excuse? we'll tell you some of the most ridiculous excuses some bosses have heard. >>> and information on your mobile phone, you can get the temperature where you live in the neighborhood and you can track rain. that's what we're doing at the we have a game tonight against the yankees f you want the information just go to our app store and down load the app. i'll talk about the forecast coming up. >> we have an accident on route 50. another here on the west side of the beltway. we'll have the traffic report coming up. it's time to change the way we clean. it's time to free ourselves from the smell and harshness of bleach. and free ourselves from worrying about the ones we love. new lysol power & free has more cleaning power than bleach. how? the secret is the hydrogen peroxide formula. it attacks tough stains and kills 99.9% of germs. new lysol power & free. powerful cleaning that's fa
at the age of 22. mitchell was known as a per se civil rights advocate. -- is a fierce civil rights advocate. >> i mourn the loss of my father but also celebrate the great life he lived. all of us are the beneficiaries of the initiatives and the other ways he impacted us as a family as well. >> there were also some hard times for clarence mitchell iii. he served 16 months in prison after being convicted in 1987 of influence peddling. funeral arrangements are pending tonight. >> coming up, a big benefit for top officials climbs higher. tonight, tracking taxpayer money. the overtime cost racked up an executive protection of the city's top officials. >> despite yearly budget deficits, those costs continue to go up. jane bode miller has more on what she has uncovered. -- jayne miller has more on what she has uncovered. >> former mayor stephanie rawlings lake has quite the entourage as she travels around. she is protected wherever she goes by city police officers whose sole duty is to provide the mayor with executive protection. it all comes with the cost. for the last fiscal year, over time alon
. ida wells, the unyielding upon it to a lynching. rosa parks, of course, the mother of the modern civil rights movement and on and on. gwendolyn brooks, tommy morrison -- toni morrison. wonderful writers. awe still have a ways to go, we hav a long ways to go. as an author to have helped our human rights commission read the agenda we have a ways to go. [applause] that is why i look at the audience, i see a lot of people that will help us get there. our board of supervisors are here, our other elected officials, the treasure is here. members from all the other communities are here. because it is not just something the african-american community can do. the chinese -- a chinese person can help with the advantage to agenda. a latino person can help. a korean person can help. a gay person can help. everyone can help accomplish the unfinished agenda for everyone. i often talk about partnerships. we have to partner with our african-american community to get things done and that will be the only correct way to get things done. is that partnership. [applause] so when i make announcements, when t
. there not sure if they were working. >>> we're waiting to hear funeral arrange thes for the civil rights activist. he was a member of the house of delegates. he was in the state senate from 1967 to 1981. he battled lung cancer. he died at 72 years old. >>> and no end in sight the meningitis outbreak. what is done to make sure the pharmacy will not do this again. >>> we are ready for the running festival this morning we're going to introduce to you a special guest. live in baltimore. this year you are going to meet the princess of the race, the first ever with her brother coming up after the break. >>> this morning, do you hate having your dog in bed with you. how far a woman has to go to get her dog to wake up. >> we're dry but we're looking at showers in new york. will it stay dry for the game? the forecast coming up. >>> and everything is up to speed here on 70 west of 695. what traffic looks like on 95 and 83 coming up on good morning, maryland. >>> we're in a new york state of mind a look at times square. back up to the big apple for a check of the tech bites. >> in the tech bites sam sung ha
families mitchell served in the house and the senate and the leader of the civil rights movement in maryland. and he died after a battle with cancer and 72 years old. >> the meningitis outbreak left 14 dead across the u.s. and one here in maryland. there are 13 confirmed cases in the state and according to the cdc they started after tainted batches of shots were send out from the company. it has contacted 90% of the nearly 14,000 people possibly infected. experts say don't hold your breathe t is far from over. >> it is clear this is not over. there were more cases today than yesterday. two deaths and a state that's involved. and i expect we're going to see and deaths and states. >> there has been been a lawsuit filed. and the pharmacy surrendered its license. they were given at 8 clinics here in maryland. >>> and playing soccer for a great cause. the blast now partnering with the family of the high school student who was shot back on the first day of school. >> goals for daniel kicks off to raise money for the medical costs. there will be a soccer marathon at the park from 2 to
with the community-based agencies and civil rights organizations that have had a very delivered reason to engage me on this, we will not be implementing the stop and frisk programs or variations of that here in san francisco. [applause] we do not wish to be distracted from the real reason we are here. we love our kids. we love our families in the bayview whether they are in sunnyvale or alice griffith or potrero hill or in the mission. we love them so much that we have to do more to care for them. we have to find those connections. [applause] there are too many stories that we are hearing from our clergy when it is too late. when we are having those individual funerals, when our parents and their brothers and sisters are crying over things that have already happened, where the jobs that we are creating did not reach these unfortunate young kids or our police commissioners and police chief working in concert with adult probation, juvenile probation, did not quite get the person who signed these papers, put their names to it saying, "i will not go back to where our was found with a gun or associate w
and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much of a be in san francisco is to the rest of the world for social justice. i spent a number of years helping to grow a small business. i got to understand the innovative spirit in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood leader and as feature of an affordable housing organization. i learned so much about the challenges facing our neighborhoods and the special jewels that are the urban villages we live in. i ran for office because i wanted to serve the city and protect all that is so special about san francisco. >> what lessons did you learn after campaigning for supervisor? >> san franciscans are incredibly interested in their city government, local politics, and making sure that we remain the most amazing city in the world. i learned that san franciscans during campaign read everything they are sent in the mail. they love to meet the candidates and engage in conversations with them. i learned how important it is to build bridges between different communities, particularly communities of diversity that we have. i was incre
senate. he will be remembered as a prominent civil right leader, he spent 15 months in prison for influenced peddaling but those who knew him say that won't be his legacy. >> one hopes he will be remembered for the passion that he had for the -- for the issues that his family was very famous for. >> he died after a battle with cancer. he was 72 years old. >>> people were waiting for a classic fight tonight. we didn't really see one. biden and ryan went head to head over the economy, afghanistan and abortion. why does tonight's debate matter? we asked local experts. >> close race, going down to the wire it comes down to a handful of voters and states. >> it's so close. debates do matter. the president had momentum, romney had a lousy week and look at what happened after the debate. >> tonight is the only time they will debate. the president and romney will meet again on tuesday. this time they will talk about foreign policy. >>> when you shop for pet food you see all sorts of eye catching claim that make you want to pick one product or another. what do terms like all natur
. the baltimore circuit courthouse is naaeddafter him, the latt civil rights leaderr and loobyist for the naacp." mitccell's 25- year political career came to an end after peddling in 1987.he ended up spending a year aad a half in friend:"to be honest with you, i don't think it did change him. i think, for a brief but, hh was alwwys there to . - &plend aavice."mitchell's legac continues witt his family... many involved in public life. his son, cllrence the foorth,, was lso a state leeislator... he nowwhostt the c-4 radio show in baltiiore.dee. keiffer kennedys,' what e had termed "the mitcheels, to a certain royaltyy"his son spoke abouu him today on the radii, &pfittingly channeliig bobby pennedy.c4 on radio:: &chhanelinn bobby kknnedy) "ddn't make my father larger actually was. he saw wrong and triid to right it. he saw pain ann tried to heal it. and, he saw racism and tried to stop it."mitchell was 72 years old. paul gessler, fox45 news at ten. ffneral plans.... have... not yet... been madee 3 3 &p3 &p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 p3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 &p3 i got my obamaphone obamaphooe i got my ob
of a the most prominent political families. and was also known as a fierce civil rights advocate. >> we do more. i mourn the loss of my father today. i celebrate the great light that he lived. so great. this historic life that he presented to all of us, who are beneficiaries of the public policy initiatives. and the other ways he impacted us as a family as well. >> our condolences go out to the family. there were some hard times for clarence mitchell iii, deserve a 16 months in prison after being convicted in 1987. charges still pending. >> now weather and traffic to gather. >> let us get you up-to-date on the area roads. if you problems your tracking. we will start in hartford county. we have an accident just in the past few minutes your watch for lane closures there. in the meantime, 83 looks good. from the maryland line down to the beltway. we are tracking an accident on a 140 to the inner loop. is backing up traffic there. we will give you a live view in a moment. and the city, russell street -- another accident. building volume on the outer loop. from 70 down toward edmonton. let us look o
and the other members of the eu have suspended habeas corpus, which have limited civil rights and human rights, which have participated in renditions and handing over european citizens to be tortured and other parts of the world or to be sent to guantanamo. so all of this brings very hollow. as for the absurd remark that the european union has united europe after the war? that is total nonsense. it did not exist after the war. were actually helped western europe, not eastern europe, which helped western europe after the second world war and had nothing to do with europe. it was the u.s., the marshall plan which allows money to build part of western europe as part of their contribution compared to the east, which was under soviet control. so why bring me eu in after the war? [indiscernible] to keep europe under some kind of control, and it is not working. european citizens in different parts of europe will be laughing at this decision. >> tariq ali, thank you for being with us, a british- pakistani political commentator, historian, activist, filmmaker, novelist, author of over 20 books includin
. >>> a muslim civil rights group based in washington launched a new campaign today in response to anti-jihad ads that went up this week in several metro stations. those ads are sponsored by the american freedom defense initiative. it compares muslim extremists to savages. the council on american islamic relations said its counterad sends a positive message. >> this ad starts with this from the koran. show forgiveness, speak for justice and avoid ignorant. we want to reintroduce civility and values to uplift the spirit of americans and to the mind of those who watch the campaign, to speak up. >> the 16-foot banners will go up next week in stations that feature the other ads and stay up for a month. >>> probably no surprise to commuters, the d.c. area has some of the worst traffic in the entire country. adam tuss got an update on some projects aimed to improve the beltway congestion. >> reporter: gas up and go. around here, it's the go that gets tough. >> i leave the house by 6:45. get on the toll road, get myself ready to spend about, what, $15 a day. it's at least 45 minutes. it's like constant
, he strengthened america with the focus on federal budget, civil rights, education, and the environment. in the white house, leon panetta was director of the office of management budget and chief of staff, fostering policies that led to a balanced budget in the 1990s making america stronger. at the central intelligence agency, he enabled a spirited response to international terrorism with notable results, disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the nation's 23rd sex tear of defense, leon panetta struck a balance as a force of the advocate for efficiencies also standing resolute in favor of an adequately funded military. bens is pleased to bestow the award recognizing those outstanding americans whose contributions to the country reflect security as the total product of our economic, intellectual, moral, and military strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all
's 7:17 right now. back to savannah, al and matt. where is the civility? >> our democracy at work. and they are in the same party, right? >> exactly the thriller in manila though. >> exactly. >> you want a piece of this? come on. >> mr. roker, what's going on? >> i'm doing okay. let's see how the rest of us are doing weather-wise. we've got a risk of severe storms stretching from dallas all the way to chicago and minneapolis. threat of damaging winds. look at this. as we head on into tomorrow we're looking at this risk of strong storms. can you see them firing up all the way from minneapolis and back down into texas. rainfall amounts, anywhere from 2 to 4 inches of rain, from oklahoma city all the way up to milwaukee. that's what's going on around s >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >> thank you. barbra streisand is one of the world's most successful performers entertaining all around the globe and never in her hometown of brooklyn, until now. nbc's mara schiavocampo is live with more. mara, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. last night this place was packed with
thought many long, hard court battles throughout the civil rights era to make sure these groups would not have to disclose their donors to people. so melanie is right that it's odd we are requiring disclosure of little amounts given to candidates, but not large amounts not given to candidates. i am open to adjustments on those. there can be a lot of changes made in offense, but i think there is a fundamental difference there. there has not been a retreat for disclosure. we have never had before in our countries history, tracking people's political activity. he might jump in there. one of the thing that comes to mind is the game has changed, so has the ability to turn around disclosure itemization quickly. that's one of the things that's happening. >> iowa to talk about the irs. i like talking about boring subjects attempt to beat me down like a path that could never get out of. it is supposed to regulate social welfare nonprofits. social welfare nonprofits, 501-c4 groups come in the whole idea of dark money, their primary purpose is supposed to be social welfare, right? they're suppos
that was supportive of the mission. and, in fact, we thought many longhorn court battles to the civil rights era to make sure these groups would not have to disclose their donors to people. melanie is right that it's this kind of odd that we're requiring disclosure of low amounts given drug to candidates but not large amounts not given drafted to candidates. i'm open to adjustments. i think if we allow changes made on both ends, i do think when it understands that there's a fundamental difference. there's not been a retreat on disclosure. what is being proposed as disclosure like we have never had before in our countries history, tracking a people's political entity. >> jump in the. one of the things that comes to mind to me is simply as the game has changed, so has the ability to turn around disclosure and itemization quickly. >> i actually want to talk about the irs. i like talk about boring subjects that can deliver that the path i can never get out of. but the irs is the agency that is supposed to regulate social welfare nonprofits. social welfare nonprofits, 501(c)(4) groups, the main group
, and such unlawful practice in 2b would have been a violation of the civil rights act of 1964, and the equal employment opportunity act. those things would have immediately discouraged anybody from hiring anyone because they would have been sued no matter what. this kind of stuff is outrageously bad government by any standard whether you're a democrat or republican. it doesn't make any sense. >> steve, ron baron is standing by. he's been a long-term investor and he's got a question for you as well. ron? >> hi, steve. thanks for coming on the show. >> hi, ron. it's a pleasure. nice to see you. >> great to see you, too. so i've been friends with steve and i have invested with steve since 1980 and we were one of the first investors, one of the first three investors in wynn resorts in 19 -- in 2001, 2000-2001, market cap was then $1 billion. and one of the things that was interesting to me, we went out to visit you and we stayed in your home that night and went to a show at the bellagio and we were talking through the bellagio and we saw one person after another who worked there would keep comin
america with his focus on budget, civil rights education and the environment. in the white house he served as director of the office of management budget and his chief of staff brought policies that brought a balanced budget in the 1990's making america stronger. he enabled a response to international terrorism with notable results disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the 2323rd secretary of defense he sought efficient sis while standing resslute in fafere of an adequately funded military. we are pleased to bestow the 2011 award recognizing those outstanding americans who is contributions to the country of security as the total product of our economic intellectual moral strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that serve in our military. bruce, my greatest thanks to you for your kind remarks and your leadership here. and i accept this a
, with civil unions, i would support repealing the marriage yet giving civil-rights to those who are of same-sex orientation. >> i support marriage equality. i was on an airplane last spring when i -- when a man sitting next to me started a conversation and said that he recruits for new hampshire's business and marriage equality is a major recruitment tool for him because people are going to our state because we want to include all people of talent and energy in our economy. on this, along with the issues surrounding women's health care, women's access to cancer screening and the funding of planned parenthood has extreme agenda pin he will sign those bills should they come to his desk as gov.. >> i think the record is very clear as far as what the agenda should be. it should be about jobs and the economy. that is what people have said in this state. that is the focus i will bring. i will be a leader for a change here in new hampshire, working with our legislature to get a right agenda set and the right agenda is about jobs and the economy. >> earlier this evening, a coin flip was held to see
you very much. any other questions, colleagues? all right. i want to thank everyone who has presented and talked about -- and especially the civil grand jury for all of your hard work. obviously you put a lot of time and effort into this. i want to thank the different department heads that are here and those that are no longer here for coming out today. so before we get to our resolution and what we will adopt, i'd like to open this up for public comment. if there are any members of the public that wish to comment on this item, i have a number of cards. i will call you up to speak but otherwise if members of the public want to line up, you can come up one by one. everyone will have two minutes. michael adaro, paula dattish, bruce jesse, jane blotchy, and richard rothman. sorry if i butchered any of those 2345eu78s. forward. everyone will have two minutes. please line up on this side of the room. >> hello. mike adisaro, former past chairman of the liaison committee for the street artists program and i would like to play a small clip. this is from 1972. >> president farrell: sf gtv. we'
that was a long list colleagues. any comments, questions, additional thoughts? all right. seeing a motion with those findings? >> resolution as amended. >> seconded. >> so we can do that without objection. again, i want to thank the civil grand jury for your work on this. you highlight issues that would not have been brought to light otherwise. again, understand that we may agree, disagree, or understand that we are constrained by certain budget issues that make us kind of punt things down the line until next fiscal year but i want to thank you for your work on this. this is a great report and i know we will see you in a few weeks on other items as well. thanks for your help. we can do that without objection. >> what action would you like on the hearing? >> president farrell: table item no. 2, and we can do that resolution with full recommendation. all right, madam clerk, can you call item 1. >> a motion revising the priorities of the budget and legislative analyst 2012 performance audit schedule. >> president farrell: thanks very much. we have -- from our budget budgd legislative analyst
universal rights and create space for civil society, a message i delivered at the highest level in a person in february. now what do these snapshots and stories from across the region tell us? on the one hand, last month's violence revealed strains of extremism that threatened those nations as well as the broader region and even the united states. on the other hand we've seen actions that would have been hard to imagine a few years ago. the democratically elected leaders and free people in the arab countries standing up for a peaceful pluralist future. it is way too soon to see how these transitions will play out. but what is not in doubt is that america has a big stake in the outcome. last month at the united nations general assembly in new york, i met with leaders from across the region. and i told each of them that the united states will continue to pursue a strategy to support emerging democracies as they were to provide effective security grounded and the rule will fall to spur economic growth and bolster space institutions. we have made those three priorities the hallmark of america's
be a live and silent auction and a civil war encampment. kind of cool. we have a link on our website for tickets. andrea and mike? >> walking the best form of transportation. >> that's right. >>> yesterday we told you the story of gallaudet university's chief diversity officer. dr. angela mccaskill was put on paid administrative leave because she signed a pigs to -- petition to give maryland voters a chance to decide on same-sex marriage. good supporters say miscomes kill cannot be a chief diversity officer without supporting equal rights for all. here's bruce leshan with more. >> reporter: the two people at the heart of the controversy are not talking. the gallaudet university president did send out an e- mail blast to students saying that doctor mccomes skill has participated in a legislative initiative that some feel is inprotect. dr. mccaskill's husband did pick up the money at their upper marlboro home. he said no comment because they're still looking for a lawyer but he did say his wife is so upset about this that she is now under a doctor's care. >> i was quite shocked. >> rep
are already sending meshes in, but fewer of them. >> that's right. we are sending in more afghans to do the job! afghans to do the job. >> martha: let's move to the civil war in syria. there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya, by saying it was in the national interests to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> it's a different country. it is 5 times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population, that is libbia, one-fifth the population, five times as large. it's in a part of the world where they are not going to see whatever would come from that war, would seep into a regional war. you are in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area newscast world. and in fact, if in fact, it blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going to have impact on the entire region, causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand and glove with the turks, with the jord
sending americans to do the job but fewer of them. >> biden: that's right. we are sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> let's move to the civil war in syria. 25,000 to 30,000 people have now been killed. president obama explained the military action taken by libya, by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> biden: it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population that is libya. it's in a part of the world where they are not going to see whatever would come from that war. it would seep into a regional war. you are in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world, and if in fact it blows up and the wrong people gain control it will have impact on the entire region. we are working hand and glove with the turks, the jar dannians, the saudis and all of the people in the region. attempting to identify the people who deserve the help so whe
the job. >> no, we're sending americans to do the job, fewer of them. >> that's right, we're sending more afghans to do the job. more afghans to do the job. >> let's move to another war, the civil war in syria, where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> it's a different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one fifth the population that is libya. one fifth the population, five times as large geographically. you would not see whatever would come from that war, would seep into a regional war. are you in a count you are in a country that is heavily populated, in the most dangerous area in the world. and if, in fact, it blows up, the wrong people gain control it will have impact on the entire region, causing potentially regional wars. we're working hand in glove with the turks,
to do the job. ryan: we are, but fewer of them. biden: that's right, more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> moderator: moving to another war. the civil war in syria where there's estimated 30,000 people killed. in march of last year, president obama explained to the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? biden: it's a different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one fifth the population that is libya, one fifth the population, five times larger geographically in a part of the world they will not see whatever comes from that war seeping into a regional war. you are in a country that's heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world, and, in fact, if, in fact, it blows up in and the wrg people gain control, it's going to have impact on the entire region causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand-and-glove with the turks, the senior -- jordannians, and the s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)